Governor Hindmarsh Hotel, Sat 1 Aug

What a night! Adelaide Roots Reggae outfit Local Revolution rocked a crowded Gov with their signature blend of Jamaican, African, and funk rhythms, leaving many a party person sore and smiling from dancing, singing, and having a great time.

The occasion was to launch their fantastic Gentle Warrior album, which was aired nearly in its entirety over the course of the set. Starting with a Sacred Land jam, the group then launched into Rise Up, the new album’s closing track, and from there, the grooves just kept coming.

After running through the catchy, stomping skank of Up And Down, front man/guitarist Lenin Garrido let us know that Local Revolution would be taking us on a musical journey around the world, starting off in Australia with a rollicking Apartheid.

Next it was off to Jamaica for The Gift, and this time the gorgeous solo interlude taken by saxophonist Nick Sverdloff on record went to trumpeter Nathaniel Jay, with similarly tasty results. The group followed up with Free Yourself, incorporating a Bob Marley medley sing-along into the middle section including snippets from Buffalo Soldier, Satisfy My Soul, and No Woman No Cry before returning to finish out the track.

As the performance progressed, the rhythms continued to flow and the band’s infectious enthusiasm combined with the audience’s feedback and The Gov’s attentive lighting and sound to continually propel the concert to new heights. Between the Horns of Revolution, vocalist/dancers Angelica Maria and Amba Bambii Rose, and the relentless rhythm section, Local Revolution put on a real show, providing great entertainment value in addition to pulling off their demanding music without letting on.

After the monster riff-heavy dub of No More War, band associate and opening DJ Nasio joined the group on percussion and the ensemble launched into Gentle Warrior highlight Mandela, easily doing justice to the album version’s African rhythms and harmonies. Bassist Neil Palmer took a relaxed bass solo and Local Revolution closed out the main set with the Nick Sverdloff-fronted Wasi Wayo. At some point around here trombonist Steven Bickley had an impressive solo, but I was apparently having too much fun to make note of which song it occurred in.

There was not the usual encore-baiting abandonment, as bassist Neil Palmer remained to slap another solo, followed by an impressive drum solo from a freshly re-costumed Stephen Morabito. Before long, Local Revolution returned, entirely refitted in funky new outfits complete with James Brown theatrics to close out the set with Funk The World Up and Gentle Warrior.

Throughout the show, the audience danced, waved their hands in the air, raised their fists in solidarity, sang along, and gave in to the irresistibly positive and fun vibes from the band. Here’s hoping we get to do this again sometime soon.

Matt Saunders

For more information on Local Revolution, head to www.local-revolution.com

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Governor Hindmarsh Hotel, Sat 1 Aug What a night! Adelaide Roots Reggae outfit Local Revolution rocked a crowded Gov with their signature blend of Jamaican, African, and funk rhythms, leaving many a party person sore and smiling from dancing, singing, and having a great time. The occasion was to launch their fantastic Gentle Warrior album, which was aired nearly in its entirety over the course of the set. Starting with a Sacred Land jam, the group then launched into Rise Up, the new album’s closing track, and from there, the grooves just kept coming. After running through the catchy, stomping skank of Up And Down, front man/guitarist Lenin Garrido let us know that Local Revolution would be taking us on a musical journey around the world, starting off in Australia with a rollicking Apartheid. Next it was off to Jamaica for The Gift, and this time the gorgeous solo interlude taken by saxophonist Nick Sverdloff on record went to trumpeter Nathaniel Jay, with similarly tasty results. The group followed up with Free Yourself, incorporating a Bob Marley medley sing-along into the middle section including snippets from Buffalo Soldier, Satisfy My Soul, and No Woman No Cry before returning to finish out the track. As the performance progressed, the rhythms continued to flow and the band’s infectious enthusiasm combined with the audience’s feedback and The Gov’s attentive lighting and sound to continually propel the concert to new heights. Between the Horns of Revolution, vocalist/dancers Angelica Maria and Amba Bambii Rose, and the relentless rhythm section, Local Revolution put on a real show, providing great entertainment value in addition to pulling off their demanding music without letting on. After the monster riff-heavy dub of No More War, band associate and opening DJ Nasio joined the group on percussion and the ensemble launched into Gentle Warrior highlight Mandela, easily doing justice to the album version’s African rhythms and harmonies. Bassist Neil Palmer took a relaxed bass solo and Local Revolution closed out the main set with the Nick Sverdloff-fronted Wasi Wayo. At some point around here trombonist Steven Bickley had an impressive solo, but I was apparently having too much fun to make note of which song it occurred in. There was not the usual encore-baiting abandonment, as bassist Neil Palmer remained to slap another solo, followed by an impressive drum solo from a freshly re-costumed Stephen Morabito. Before long, Local Revolution returned, entirely refitted in funky new outfits complete with James Brown theatrics to close out the set with Funk The World Up and Gentle Warrior. Throughout the show, the audience danced, waved their hands in the air, raised their fists in solidarity, sang along, and gave in to the irresistibly positive and fun vibes from the band. Here’s hoping we get to do this again sometime soon. Matt Saunders For more information on Local Revolution, head to www.local-revolution.com. 

The Clothesline Rating...

Matt Saunders

The entire room gave in to the irresistibly positive and fun vibes from the band.

User Rating: 4.6 ( 2 votes)
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